April 23, 2014
transitmaps:

New Official Map: MBTA Rapid Transit, Based On Winning Contest Entry
First sightings are coming in of Boston’s new rapid transit map being deployed on trains and stations, and prints are also available from MBTAgifts.com. For now, the map on the actual MBTA website is still the previous version.
The blurb about the map on MBTAgifts.com says:

The 2014 MBTA rapid transit map was the result of an international competition for designs. This map is based on the winning submission and has been complete[ly] redrawn and updated by Central Planning Transportation Staff for the MBTA.

Completely redrawn. Based on. Uh oh.
So here’s a side by side comparison between Michael Kvrivishvili’s contest entry (left) and the final map that the MBTA has ended up with (right). It’s clear that the final map is based on Michael’s entry, but with a lot of changes.
Some are necessary (the use of standard ADA accessibility symbols), some are improvements (SL 1 and 2 are shown properly as loop lines, and the treatment of the airport shuttle buses is one of the best I’ve seen so far), but the majority of the changes dilute and harm the very strong and graphic design themes of Michael’s original map. 
Michael’s entry focussed very strongly on straightening out the routes as much as possible, reducing the number of curves to the bare minimum required. His Red Line was perfectly straight, apart from a last flick down to Braintree. The Ashmont-Mattapan branch was similarly straightened out. Not any more: the Red Line has pretty much reverted to its previous shape, with more twists and unevenly spaced stations.
Similarly, Michael’s Green Line, which ran in a beautifully clean straight line from Haymarket all the way to Heath Street, has also gained extra curves, all seemingly because of a “need” to show that the line changes direction after Boylston.
Other changes that affect Michael’s original design balance: the reintroduction of “blobby” interchange markers, the thinning of commuter rail lines in relation to their (now oversized) station markers, smaller station labels, more labels that cut across route lines, abbreviations for station names (“Gov’t Center” just looks terrible) the use of ALL CAPS for terminal stations (bold text alone is enough differentiation, and easier to read), the elimination of the visual “hook” of the perfect diamond in the centre of the map… and worst of all:
The replacement of Michael’s elegantly stylised coastline that matched the design of the route lines perfectly with the god-awful “pseudo-geographical” background of the previous map. It looks hideous.
It seems to me that there’s a battle on this final map between Michael’s original diagrammatic approach and a desire from someone at the MBTA for something more like a “real map”, and it’s these competing interests that harm the end result so much. Realistically, a Boston transit map that has to fit into a square is never going to be even remotely geographically accurate (as this image from Wikipedia shows). Michael’s well-considered design approach to this inherent problem was to eschew geography and create a diagram of services, reducing the number of curves in each line to make them easier to follow and evenly spacing stations as much as possible. That approach has been compromised by this final map, which really can’t decide what it wants to be — the old map or the new one.

transitmaps:

New Official Map: MBTA Rapid Transit, Based On Winning Contest Entry

First sightings are coming in of Boston’s new rapid transit map being deployed on trains and stations, and prints are also available from MBTAgifts.com. For now, the map on the actual MBTA website is still the previous version.

The blurb about the map on MBTAgifts.com says:

The 2014 MBTA rapid transit map was the result of an international competition for designs. This map is based on the winning submission and has been complete[ly] redrawn and updated by Central Planning Transportation Staff for the MBTA.

Completely redrawn. Based on. Uh oh.

So here’s a side by side comparison between Michael Kvrivishvili’s contest entry (left) and the final map that the MBTA has ended up with (right). It’s clear that the final map is based on Michael’s entry, but with a lot of changes.

Some are necessary (the use of standard ADA accessibility symbols), some are improvements (SL 1 and 2 are shown properly as loop lines, and the treatment of the airport shuttle buses is one of the best I’ve seen so far), but the majority of the changes dilute and harm the very strong and graphic design themes of Michael’s original map. 

Michael’s entry focussed very strongly on straightening out the routes as much as possible, reducing the number of curves to the bare minimum required. His Red Line was perfectly straight, apart from a last flick down to Braintree. The Ashmont-Mattapan branch was similarly straightened out. Not any more: the Red Line has pretty much reverted to its previous shape, with more twists and unevenly spaced stations.

Similarly, Michael’s Green Line, which ran in a beautifully clean straight line from Haymarket all the way to Heath Street, has also gained extra curves, all seemingly because of a “need” to show that the line changes direction after Boylston.

Other changes that affect Michael’s original design balance: the reintroduction of “blobby” interchange markers, the thinning of commuter rail lines in relation to their (now oversized) station markers, smaller station labels, more labels that cut across route lines, abbreviations for station names (“Gov’t Center” just looks terrible) the use of ALL CAPS for terminal stations (bold text alone is enough differentiation, and easier to read), the elimination of the visual “hook” of the perfect diamond in the centre of the map… and worst of all:

The replacement of Michael’s elegantly stylised coastline that matched the design of the route lines perfectly with the god-awful “pseudo-geographical” background of the previous map. It looks hideous.

It seems to me that there’s a battle on this final map between Michael’s original diagrammatic approach and a desire from someone at the MBTA for something more like a “real map”, and it’s these competing interests that harm the end result so much. Realistically, a Boston transit map that has to fit into a square is never going to be even remotely geographically accurate (as this image from Wikipedia shows). Michael’s well-considered design approach to this inherent problem was to eschew geography and create a diagram of services, reducing the number of curves in each line to make them easier to follow and evenly spacing stations as much as possible. That approach has been compromised by this final map, which really can’t decide what it wants to be — the old map or the new one.

April 17, 2014
unicornpsycho:

Chicago CTA | via Tumblr op We Heart It

unicornpsycho:

Chicago CTA | via Tumblr op We Heart It

(via nerdbird)

April 16, 2014
the-passenger-conductor:

At High Bridge New Jersey a New Jersey Transit Conductor checks his watch prior to departing for the 1 hour and 19 minute journey to Penn Station Newark.  In addition to presenting a uniform and professional appearance, a conductor’s hat is also useful for keeping snow off your face.  Hopefully 9:25 will come around soon so you can get out of the snow!

the-passenger-conductor:

At High Bridge New Jersey a New Jersey Transit Conductor checks his watch prior to departing for the 1 hour and 19 minute journey to Penn Station Newark.  In addition to presenting a uniform and professional appearance, a conductor’s hat is also useful for keeping snow off your face.  Hopefully 9:25 will come around soon so you can get out of the snow!

(via intermodal)

April 16, 2014
4gifs:

A reminder from the conductor that train tracks aren’t playgrounds. [video]

4gifs:

A reminder from the conductor that train tracks aren’t playgrounds. [video]

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via theothermayor)

April 16, 2014
es44c4:

One of Hoboken Terminal’s four main yard, the Days Yard, is full of train sets on layover for the afternoon commute. (via RailPictures.Net Photo: NJT 6029 NJ Transit Alstom Comet V at Hoboken, New Jersey by Michael William Sullivan)

es44c4:

One of Hoboken Terminal’s four main yard, the Days Yard, is full of train sets on layover for the afternoon commute. (via RailPictures.Net Photo: NJT 6029 NJ Transit Alstom Comet V at Hoboken, New Jersey by Michael William Sullivan)

(via intermodal)

April 14, 2014
acarefullycuratedmess:

Afternoon Hiawatha

acarefullycuratedmess:

Afternoon Hiawatha

(Source: Wikipedia, via intermodal)

April 14, 2014
historina:

http://history.xazina.com/teddy-roosevelt-speaking-at-the-back-of-a-railroad-car-may-25-1907-2000x2462/

Teddy Roosevelt speaking at the back of a railroad car, May 25, 1907 [2000x2462]

historina:

http://history.xazina.com/teddy-roosevelt-speaking-at-the-back-of-a-railroad-car-may-25-1907-2000x2462/

Teddy Roosevelt speaking at the back of a railroad car, May 25, 1907 [2000x2462]

(via intermodal)

April 13, 2014

(Source: happyharry101, via intermodal)

April 13, 2014
worldwiderails:

Welcome and thanks to all #446 followers!Our theme for the week is locomotive and train number 446!Amtrak #40 Spruce Creek (via Amtrak #40 Spruce Creek)

worldwiderails:

Welcome and thanks to all #446 followers!
Our theme for the week is locomotive and train number 446!

Amtrak #40 Spruce Creek (via Amtrak #40 Spruce Creek)

(via intermodal)

April 13, 2014
norfolksouthern:

Getting ready to roll with day two of the Tri-County Mountaineer excursion from Grundy, Va., to Devon, W.Va., and return. Many thanks to the hard work of our team, the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum and the volunteers for making this excursion possible. All aboard!

norfolksouthern:

Getting ready to roll with day two of the Tri-County Mountaineer excursion from Grundy, Va., to Devon, W.Va., and return. Many thanks to the hard work of our team, the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum and the volunteers for making this excursion possible. All aboard!